What is an intent?

An intent may comprise a group of two or more words that have semantic meaning together or that represent a cluster or group of texts that share the same semantic meaning, e.g., the reason why the user has written a certain text or the core of that text. 

Some examples of intents are those that are topic-related (e.g., bag-check), action related (e.g., Pay-bill, fix-please), sentiment related (e.g., great-service), emotion related (e.g., Hate-airline), characteristic-related (e.g., Gluten-free, battery-life), brand related (e.g., Trader Joe’s-quality), and product related (e.g., Iphone-x), but others may be utilized.

Generating intents 

How are intents created? Based on frequency of co-occurrence?

The algorithm that does the Intent Induction is based on measures from Information Theory. Based on the relevance of semantic representations in the whole corpora, the algorithm is able to extract which are the most representative and meaningful contexts using entropy, information gain and divergence measures.

Are intents always bigrams?

Intents don’t have to be bigrams but bigrams are usually a way of contexts disambiguation. Eg “customer” may be ambiguous but “customer+service” is not.

Naming intents 

How is the intent name defined?

An intent may comprise a group of two or more words that have semantic meaning together or that represent a cluster or group of texts that share the same semantic meaning. We define the name using that group of words.

Do the words in the intent title have to be present in texts?

Once an intent, and therefore the semantic relationship between a pair of words or more, is understood by a system of the present invention, such a system can identify similar contexts automatically even if the group of words comprising the intent is not included in the similar context. By way of example, an inquiry made as to whether a passenger may “take” a “briefcase” onboard may be related to a “bag-check” intent.

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